Is a Career Change on Your Horizon?

Making a career change is nothing new in today’s job market.

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I’ve heard it said that the average American changescareers at least once in his or her life. Long gone arethe days of working for the same company from the timeyou graduate high school or college until that magicalretirement day.

You sure won’t find that kind of loyalty from companies to their workers these days, and it’s rare to find that kindof loyalty from the average worker as well. What withcompanies merging, downsizing, and moving their operationsoffshore, you’d be wise to plan for a career change somewhere along the line in your life.

Of course, losing one job doesn’t automatically mean thatyou can never find another job in the same industry orcareer path. Hopefully, you will. But what if you can’tfind another job? Or what if you don’t really want to? Maybe you’re bored with what you’ve been doing, or you’vegone as far as you can in that career and you’re ready fornew challenges?

Is it really possible to switch to a new career midstreamin your working life?

The answer is a resounding yes! But you have to know how togo about it. It takes a bit of planning, thorough self-assessment, and perhaps additional training.

When I tired of the grind in health administration as anurse, I spent about 2 years trying to figure out what elseI could do. Luckily, I was able to parlay a love and talentfor writing into a new career as a health writer. I did have to prove my ability to write–even though much of myjob responsibility in my previous healthcare administrationjob did involve writing. I was fortunate enough to be able to use networking and some lucky breaks to get into thecareer I wanted with a minimum of effort.

My partner, Jim, has been a systems engineer for more than20 years, but graduated with a bachelors degree in math originally. When he began to search for a career changealternative, his path was not quite as clear as mine hadbeen. Finally, though, after spending quite a bit of timeon self-assessment, he honed in on his love for trainingand teaching. But you can’t just move into the field ofteaching with no experience or education. Fortunately, theshortage of qualified teachers–especially in certain highneeds areas–has led to the development of a number of “alternative path” programs for teaching. Jim has enrolledin just such an online program out of Montana State University and will be launching his new career later thisyear as a high school math teacher!

So, the question is… once you’ve figured out what you want to do in your new career and you’ve gotten the training you need, how do you sell yourself to a newemployer?

The first thing you want to consider is the format for yourresume. The traditional chronological resume format is notyour best choice for a career change. Instead, you want touse either a functional–or even better, combination–format. You can read more about the different types of resume formats here:http://www.powerful-sample-resume-formats.com/formats

Second, you need to take a look at your transferable skills. That is, what current or past experience or skillsdo you possess (either from past jobs or in your personallife) that you could use in your new career?

For example, one of my readers recently asked how hecould get into interior design without any previous jobexperience or training. I’m not sure you CAN get intothis field without any training, but if so, then Iadvised him to look at any design experience he’s had,perhaps with redecorating his own or a friend’s home. Ialso encouraged him to build a portfolio of his work,which can be a very effective way to get an employer’s attention.

Thirdly, you have to be honest with yourself about whetheryou can really make a career change without adding to yourskills and credentials by getting some training in the newfield. There’s a lot to be said for the contacts you can make during such training too, that may help you networkwith people who can provide an entree into the new career.

In summary, anyone can make a career change if they reallywant to. But to do so, you’ll need to know what related skills and experience you bring to the table. And you’llneed to know how to sell yourself to a prospective employer. Career change is inevitable… you can count onit! But make sure it’s on your terms by making a solidcareer change plan.

What is the Difference between stress and strain?

When you are talking about solids and various other materials, it is crucial to understand how these types of materials usually react when a force is applied. This process helps the students identify their strengths, deformations, and various other parameters acting on the objects. And to find these parameters, the stress and strain quantities are important. Here, in this article, we are going to provide a detailed guide about these aspects including how we define stress and strain, their types, and difference between stress and strain. Also let us learn about stress formula and strain formula.

Why is it important to study stress and strain?
It is important to study the stress and strain differences and basics, and stress strain curve, all of which will help in ascertaining the amount of stress or load that a material is capable of handling before it breaks, gets distorted, or stretches. So, the study of stress and strain is all about understanding how and why certain materials are more malleable and can be easily deformed or distorted than others.

Stress is defined as the force per unit area that is observed by a material when an external force is applied. These external forces are generally uneven heating, permanent deformation, etc. These in turn help students calculate and find the plastic, elastic, and fluid behaviour of each material under different forces.

Types of Stress
There are different types of Stress that can be applied to a material, such as

Compressive Stress
When a force acts on a body, it causes a reduction in the volume of the said body, resulting in deformation. This type of stress is referred to as Compressive stress.

Compressive stress leads to material failure that is ultimately caused due to tension. The compressive stress from its application to brittle materials differs from that of ductile materials.

Tensile Stress
When an external force is applied per unit area on a material, and it results in the stretching of the said material, then it is described as Tensile Stress.

Tensile stress leads to elongation of any material due to external stretching force.

What is Strain?
If a body experiences deformation due to the applied external force in a particular direction, it is called strain. Moreover, the strain does not have any dimensions, as it only explains the change in the shape of the object.

Types of Strain
Similar to stress, strain is also differentiated into Compressive Strain and Tensile Strain.

Compressive Strain
Compressive strain is defined as the deformation observed on an object when compressive stress acts on it. And in this type of strain, the length of the material or object generally decreases.

Tensile Strain

The Tensile stress acting on a body or a material that causes the increase in the length of said material is referred to as a tensile strain.

Let’s understand the stress strain diagram in detail,

The OA line represents the Proportional Limit, as it described the region, where the material or body obeys Hooke’s Law. And this line can help students to calculate Young’s Modulus, using the ratio of stress and strain.   
Now, the AB line represents the Elastic Limit of the object, which means that after this point, the body does not retain its original shape or size, when the acting force is removed.   
As you can guess, the BC lines describe the Yield Point. Which, when force is applied on the material, then there is complete deformation in the object, which cannot be reversed, even if the force is removed.   
D point on the graph is the point beyond which students can observe the complete failure of the object, as it crosses the maximum stress a material can endure. This point is stated as Ultimate Stress Point.   
E is the Fracture of Breaking Point, at which students can observe the complete failure of deformation of the object, regardless of the force whether it is applied or removed.  
Difference between stress and strain
In physics, stress refers to the force that is acting per unit area of the object, whereas strain depicts the ratio of the change in an object’s dimension to its original dimension. In physical parlance, stress is equivalent to Pressure and its unit is Pascal or psi, or pounds. On the other hand, strain signifies the ratio of change in dimensions to that of the original dimension, therefore has no units of measurement. Strain, however, can be measured by strain gauges. Stress and strain curve are related, but are characterized by distinct properties. Stress causes deformation, while strain can be caused by several types of stress, including tension or compression.

Difference between plain stress and plane strain
Plane stress happens when the value of normal stress remains zero and the sheer stress which is seen perpendicular to the direction of the applied load is presumed zero. Plane stress is based on assumption and is measured approximately. On the other hand, plane strain is about distortion in the object that is perpendicular to the object’s plane. If plane stress is more of an approximation, then plane strain is more accurate.

Shear stress and shear strain
Shear stress is the stress that is applied parallel to the plane of the object which renders lateral distortion in the object. As far as shear strain is concerned, it reflects the magnitude of lateral strain in terms of tanθ. Shear Strain is shown as tanθ = Lateral Distortion / Perpendicular height.

Stress and strain are fundamental concepts that play a crucial role in understanding the mechanical behavior of materials. The stress-strain curve provides a graphical representation of this relationship, offering insights into the material’s strength, stiffness, and ductility. By studying stress and strain, engineers and scientists can design and analyze structures and materials to ensure their safety, reliability, and performance in real-world applications.

In the above article, we have explained in detail the terms, stress and Strain, how they act, units of stress and strain, types of stress and strain, etc. This will be helpful for students to solve any kind of problems from these chapters or understand other subtopics easily from the next chapters. However, if you are still worried about how to cover many complex topics and chapters in Physics. Then the best solution for you is to join Online Coaching Platforms. Like the Tutoroot platform, which offers cost-effective online interactive classes that come with various amazing benefits for the students. Visit the Tutoroot site to learn more about these benefits.

Unraveling the Essence of a Career

A career is often perceived as a linear path, but in reality, it’s a complex tapestry woven from our work-related contributions to society over a lifetime. It’s not just about the jobs we hold but also the unpaid roles, volunteer work, and the various positions we undertake, whether part-time or full-time. From being a student to a homemaker, or a professional in any field, every role plays a part in shaping our career. In today’s dynamic job market, career options are diverse, ranging from self-employment to organizational or project-based roles. Career development is a multifaceted process influenced by psychological, sociological, economic, physical, and chance factors. It’s about planning and strategizing, reflecting on one’s abilities and the work environment, and taking action to craft one’s life’s work. This development can occur in educational institutions, workplaces, and through personal experiences. The power to shape your career lies within, requiring self-reflection, resourcefulness, motivation, flexibility, and a commitment to maintaining relevant skills.

The Evolution of Career Development
The concept of a career has undergone significant transformation over the years. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, individuals born between 1957 and 1964 held an average of 12.3 jobs from ages 18 to 52. This indicates a shift from the traditional notion of a lifelong career with a single employer to a more dynamic career landscape with multiple job changes (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics).

In the past, career planning was often compared to a train journey, with a predetermined track leading to retirement. However, as Richard Knowdell suggested in the 1990s, it has evolved into an all-terrain vehicle ride, requiring individuals to navigate through an ever-changing terrain. The old metaphor of a career as a marriage has been replaced by the idea of a career as a series of dates or an amusement park with various rides, as discussed at a California Career Development Conference.

The ladder metaphor is now considered outdated, as career progression no longer implies a straightforward ascent within one organization. Instead, it’s likened to a maze with numerous directions and possibilities. My own analogy likens a career to a wardrobe, where different outfits represent various roles and jobs that change with personal growth and evolving interests. This approach emphasizes the need for adaptability and personal expression through work.

Navigating the Modern Career Landscape
In the modern world, planning and strategizing one’s career is an active and dynamic process. Individuals are encouraged to forge their unique paths, often stepping away from traditional routes. The future job market is unpredictable, with new roles and fields emerging that are currently unknown. This uncertainty underscores the importance of being flexible and open to new experiences while learning from each job, no matter how small.

Mark Twain’s words, “There is no security in life, only opportunity,” resonate with today’s career mindset. We must embrace our multifaceted talents and remain adaptable, using each job as a stepping stone towards future opportunities.

Michelle L. Casto is a whole life coach, speaker, and author dedicated to helping individuals discover bright ideas for their lives and empowering them to shine. For more insights or a free coaching session, visit Get Smart! Series and Brightlight Coaching.